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CFP: UACES CRN workshop on ‘The politics of knowledge: Europe and beyond’ (16-17 July 2015, Robinson College, Cambridge)

Workshop organisers:

Dr Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU Singapore) – hsuan.chou [at] cantab.net

Dr Julie Smith (Robinson College, University of Cambridge) – jes42 [at] cam.ac.uk

Mitchell Young (Charles University in Prague) – young.mitchell [at] gmail.com

 

Workshop Aim

Knowledge policies are at the forefront of contemporary global politics. There is an accepted belief among policymakers that knowledge is the foundation on which societies coalesce and economies thrive. Indeed, the competition for knowledge can be said to be driving the global race for talent. For the second workshop of the UACES collaborative research network on the European Research Area, we invite contributions covering and going beyond Europe to examine the politics of knowledge policies around the world. This workshop is geared towards answering the following questions: What key themes should we address when we talk about the politics of knowledge policies? How and why are these themes crucial for our understanding of politics and policymaking in sectors such as higher education, research, and innovation?

We invite theoretical, empirical and comparative contributions that investigate the role of the ‘four I-s’ – ideas, interests, instruments and institutions – in the politics of knowledge policies. By role, we refer to the effects that ideas, actors (individual, organisational), policy instruments and institutions have had on the national, regional and global governance of knowledge policies, and vice versa. This focus on ‘roles’ is to enable a multidisciplinary discussion on whether these factors share defining characteristics across the different knowledge policy domains (research, higher education, innovation), between distinct governance levels, and within and across geographical regions.

Potential papers could explore a variety of themes. For instance, they may address how and why particular ideas (‘excellence’, ‘talent’, ‘21st century skills’, ‘knowledge-based’) find policy resonance around the world, while others fail to do so. Are some of the newly emerging ideas a repackaging of earlier ones and, if so, what accounts for their rise on the policy agenda? Papers may examine the configuration and re-configuration of actors from the public and private sectors in designing, shaping, implementing, promoting or blocking knowledge policy from above, below and through other governance channels. Contributions may investigate and compare the sets of policy instruments adopted to facilitate knowledge policy cooperation throughout the world’s different geographical regions. Here, for example, it would be interesting to identify whether there are standard sets of measures that bilateral or multilateral cooperation embrace for promoting collaboration in the knowledge policy sector. Papers may also assess the institutional set-ups introduced to facilitate knowledge policy cooperation, the mandates given and decisional powers delegated to these institutions, and the effects, if any, that these institutions have had over time.

This CRN continues to welcome scholars at all career stages, theoretical and methodological approaches to examining knowledge policy cooperation in Europe and around the world.


Workshop call for paper
 

We will provide accommodation, refreshments and meals for accepted presenters for the duration of the workshop. Applicants may propose more than one paper for consideration, but no one will be permitted to present or co-present more than one paper. We encourage student members of UACES to consider applying for travel funding (http://uaces.org/funding/travel/).

Please contact any of the workshop organisers if you have any questions and please submit your proposal before the 13th of April 2015, 18.00 GMT at: http://goo.gl/forms/tq8ywKKdIu 


Important Dates
 

13 April 2015 (18.00 GMT): extended abstract due

24 April 2015: acceptance notification

18 June 2015: workshop programme available

02 July 2015: full papers due

16-17 July 2015: workshop

Programme: ERA CRN workshop on ‘Governance of the Europe of Knowledge’

2014 Cambridge updated programme – FINAL PROGRAMME

Reminder – CfP: 44th UACES Annual Conference in Cork

Dear all,

The UACES collaborative research network on the European Research Area invites you to submit papers to the following two panels (details below). Feel free to get in touch with us should you have any queries.

All the very best wishes,
Hsuan, Mitchell and Diana

----------------

Panel 1 (send abstracts to Mitchell Young: young.mitchell 'at' gmail.com)

Exploring the role of ideas in the Europe of Knowledge: from paradigm to blueprints

Chair/discussant: Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU, Singapore) and Mitchell Young (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic)

The year 2014 is significant for the Europe of Knowledge, marking the long-anticipated delivery and renewal of Europe’s ambition to become the global knowledge leader. Indeed, it is the deadline set for completing the European Research Area (ERA), as well as the official start of Horizon 2020, the main EU funding instrument for pure and applied research. Against this backdrop this panel invites contributions that explore the role that ideas play in European research and higher education policy cooperation. By ‘role’, we refer to the independent or intervening effects that an idea – such as the ‘fifth freedom’, competitiveness, excellence, talent, internationalisation, ‘digital revolution’, ‘Single Market of Knowledge’ and so on – have had on constructing the Europe of Knowledge. Ideas are pervasive in all aspects of public policymaking at both the national and European levels. They act as deeply entrenched paradigmatic beliefs concerning how things should and ought to be done, as well as specific policy blueprints for resolving particular policy problems. Articulated through discourse, ideas, championed by ‘amplifiers’, may chart the pathways of integration in unexpected ways. How have prominent ideas in the ERA and the European Higher Education Area determined the evolution of the Europe of Knowledge? Are there visible European and national champions of certain ideas and what strategies do they apply to promote them? And how have ideas been translated into European and domestic research and higher education policies? We welcome comparative, theoretical and empirical papers addressing these questions from practitioners and scholars at all career stages.

Panel 2 (send abstracts to Diana Beech: djb96 'at' cam.ac.uk)

Policy instruments in the Europe of Knowledge: design and implementation  

Chair/discussant: Diana Beech (University of Cambridge, UK)

Policy instruments in the knowledge domain come in a variety of forms. They may be, inter alia, ‘hard’ (i.e. directives, regulations), ‘soft’ (standards), ‘distributive’ (framework programmes, now Horizon 2020), or even ‘networked’. Put simply, the instruments for consolidating the European Research Area (ERA) and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) – the two central pillars making up the Europe of Knowledge – can be considered to be a veritable ‘policy mix’. This panel invites contributions that explore the role of instruments in the construction of the Europe of Knowledge. We are interested in papers that identify the explanatory or intervening effect that policy design and implementation have had on knowledge policy integration in Europe. Papers can address developments at the EU-level or the implementation or translation of EU instruments in domestic arenas. We welcome analyses of any knowledge policy instruments: scientific mobility (e.g. knowledge networks; talent migration; scientific visa); funding; qualifications framework and so on. Papers can address any of these questions: How are the instruments developed, by whom, according to what models and with what political aims? Are the national and EU instruments competing or complementing? Is there evidence to suggest that national or EU instruments are steering European research or higher education governance? Or are the pressures external to the integration process (‘internationalisation’)? What are the effects of policy implementation? To what extent has Europe succeeded in meeting its targets? Papers adopting a comparative approach are especially encouraged. We welcome contributions from both practitioners and scholars at all career stages.

Interested paper presenters are asked to circulate the following to the above designated panel chairs by 10 January 2014:

-       Full name

-       University/Institution

-       Postal Address

-       Email Address

-       The name of any co-authors

-       The title of the paper

-       Keyword(s)

-       Research discipline

-       A 250-word abstract

CFP: 2014 UACES (1-4 September 2014, Cork)

Panel 1 (send abstracts to Mitchell Young: young.mitchell@gmail.com)

Exploring the role of ideas in the Europe of Knowledge: from paradigm to blueprints

Chair/discussant: Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU, Singapore) and Mitchell Young (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic)

The year 2014 is significant for the Europe of Knowledge, marking the long-anticipated delivery and renewal of Europe’s ambition to become the global knowledge leader. Indeed, it is the deadline set for completing the European Research Area (ERA), as well as the official start of Horizon 2020, the main EU funding instrument for pure and applied research. Against this backdrop this panel invites contributions that explore the role that ideas play in European research and higher education policy cooperation. By ‘role’, we refer to the independent or intervening effects that an idea – such as the ‘fifth freedom’, competitiveness, excellence, talent, internationalisation, ‘digital revolution’, ‘Single Market of Knowledge’ and so on – have had on constructing the Europe of Knowledge. Ideas are pervasive in all aspects of public policymaking at both the national and European levels. They act as deeply entrenched paradigmatic beliefs concerning how things should and ought to be done, as well as specific policy blueprints for resolving particular policy problems. Articulated through discourse, ideas, championed by ‘amplifiers’, may chart the pathways of integration in unexpected ways. How have prominent ideas in the ERA and the European Higher Education Area determined the evolution of the Europe of Knowledge? Are there visible European and national champions of certain ideas and what strategies do they apply to promote them? And how have ideas been translated into European and domestic research and higher education policies? We welcome comparative, theoretical and empirical papers addressing these questions from practitioners and scholars at all career stages.

Panel 2 (send abstracts to Diana Beech: djb96@cam.ac.uk)

Policy instruments in the Europe of Knowledge: design and implementation  

Chair/discussant: Diana Beech (University of Cambridge, UK) and Julie Smith (University of Cambridge, UK)

Policy instruments in the knowledge domain come in a variety of forms. They may be, inter alia, ‘hard’ (i.e. directives, regulations), ‘soft’ (standards), ‘distributive’ (framework programmes, now Horizon 2020), or even ‘networked’. Put simply, the instruments for consolidating the European Research Area (ERA) and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) – the two central pillars making up the Europe of Knowledge – can be considered to be a veritable ‘policy mix’. This panel invites contributions that explore the role of instruments in the construction of the Europe of Knowledge. We are interested in papers that identify the explanatory or intervening effect that policy design and implementation have had on knowledge policy integration in Europe. Papers can address developments at the EU-level or the implementation or translation of EU instruments in domestic arenas. We welcome analyses of any knowledge policy instruments: scientific mobility (e.g. knowledge networks; talent migration; scientific visa); funding; qualifications framework and so on. Papers can address any of these questions: How are the instruments developed, by whom, according to what models and with what political aims? Are the national and EU instruments competing or complementing? Is there evidence to suggest that national or EU instruments are steering European research or higher education governance? Or are the pressures external to the integration process (‘internationalisation’)? What are the effects of policy implementation? To what extent has Europe succeeded in meeting its targets? Papers adopting a comparative approach are especially encouraged. We welcome contributions from both practitioners and scholars at all career stages.

Interested paper presenters are asked to circulate the following to the above panel chairs by 10 January 2014:

–       Full name

–       University/Institution

–       Postal Address

–       Email Address

–       The name of any co-authors

–       The title of the paper

–       Keyword(s)

–       Research discipline

–       A 250-word abstract

Launch presentation

Missed our presentations at UACES, ECPR and CHER?

No worries, have a look here and contact us if you have further queries:

launch-meeting

ERA-CRN members at UACES

Members of the ERA collaborative research network will be presenting at the 43rd Annual Conference of the Academic Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES) to take place 2-4 September 2013 at Leeds:

  • ‘Public-private Boundaries in Research Policies and Possible Consequences from EU Primary Law – the Example of Competition Law Constraints on Research Funding Policies in Germany, the Netherlands and England’ (Andrea Gideon) in the panel ‘Boundaries of the Europe of Knowledge in Times of Crisis’ (Tuesday, 3 September, 11.00-12.30)
  • ‘The Digital Revolution and the Sectoral Boundaries of the Europe of Knowledge’ (Meng-Hsuan Chou) in the panel ‘Boundaries of the Europe of Knowledge in Times of Crisis’ (Tuesday, 3 September, 11.00-12.30)
  • ‘Experimentalism in the EU Multi-level Research Governance Architecture: The Case of European Research Area’ (Inga Ulnicane-Ozolina) in the panel ‘Constructing the European Research Area in Times of Crisis?’ (Tuesday, 3 September, 11.00-12.30)
  • ‘Values: A Legitimate Driver of ERA Policy?’ (Diana Beech) in the panel ‘Constructing the European Research Area in Times of Crisis?’ (Tuesday, 3 September, 11.00-12.30)

Please join us for our launch meeting at UACES: Monday, 2 September, 18.45-19.30 (Where: Room 2.46, Liberty Building, University of Leeds)

ERA-CRN Launch Events

For details of the ERA-CRN launch events next month, check out our new poster!

 

ERA CRN launch poster

 

ERA Launch Poster    

 

 

ERA-CRN Launch Event

Save the date!

European Research Area CRN launch meeting

Leeds, United Kingdom
2 September 2013

crn_logo.gif

The UACES CRN on the European Research Area will host its launch meeting at the 2013 UACES General Meeting. We welcome all UACES members to come and learn more about our research objectives and clusters!

Time: 18.45-19.30, 2 September 2013 (Monday) at the Liberty Building (room 2.46), University of Leeds.

We are now an official UACES-CRN

The ERA-CRN is pleased to announce it has received funding for the next three years from UACES – The Academic Association for Contemporary European Studies

Find us in the UACES Network directory here!

ERA-CRN Section @ 7th ECPR General Conference, Bordeaux, 4-7 September 2013

The ERA-CRN has had a Section accepted at the 7th ECPR General Conference to be held in Bordeaux, France, from 4 until 7th September 2013. The Section is entitled ‘Europe of Knowledge (Education, Higher Education and Research Policy)’ and includes no less than SEVEN panels. These are as follows:

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1. Universities and European Integration at a Time of Crisis: A Double Trust Problem?

Panel Chair: Martina Vukasovic Universitetet I Oslo
Panel Discussant: Martina Vukasovic Universitetet I Oslo
Abstract: European integration (bottom-up) and Europeanisation (top-down) of higher education (HE), in comparison to other policy sectors (e.g. research), are expected to face increased obstacles at times of crisis. Firstly, according to the subsidiarity principle, HE is a national competence. Indeed, the recognition of qualifications in regulated professions is the only area in which binding EU directives have been adopted; all existing initiatives – either EU or pan-European (e.g. the Bologna Process) – in the HE field are voluntary. Secondly, HE systems and institutions are generally resistant to change due to the ‘bottom-heaviness’, ‘loose-coupling’ and importance of professional autonomy. This means that the Europeanisation of HE is likely to be incremental and partial even during ordinary times. It is assumed that the current crisis, or, rather, the multiplicity of crises related to the economic downturn, fiscal instability, perception of democratic deficit associated with the handling of the crisis, and decreased trust in European institutions, may lead governments to withdraw support from HE and focus on other ‘more pressing’ concerns. This panel invites contributions that address the following questions: How has the cooperation in the HE field responded to the multiplicity of crises in Europe? Has there only been one response or could we identify several (and are they complementary or contradictory)? Could we conclude that European HE initiatives have lost their momentum due to the crisis or have they become more robust and resilient? HE was exported to other sectors as a ‘solution’ previously, has this continued to be the case? In situations where governments have decreased their support (e.g. funding) for HE, how have HE institutions reacted? Did these institutions turn to the EU for support and, in so doing, increased their trust and interest in European HE initiatives?
—-
2. A Competitive European Knowledge Economy at Times of Crisis: Are the Talents Coming?
Panel Chair: Lucie Cerna University of Oxford
Panel Discussant: Lucie Cerna University of Oxford
Abstract: The Europe of Knowledge requires a sufficient number of knowledge workers to generate the necessary ‘manpower’ for consolidating a competitive knowledge economy. This has contributed to a new emphasis in immigration policies in recent years: –national governments have changed their policies in order to attract ‘the best and brightest’, but attempts in the European Union (EU) are also visible. Indeed, many countries and regions have been engaging in a ‘global war for talent’ due to increasing labour shortages, ageing populations and efforts to build knowledge economies. However, even high-skilled immigration creates winners and losers internationally and at home, and this question is even more pertinent with the recent economic crisis. Has Europe become more restrictive towards foreign talent and, if so, how? Or does it consider them as a stimulus during the crisis? How have different EU member states responded? Are talents coming to Europe or choosing instead other destinations, such as Australia, Canada and the United States? Are there changes to recent talent migration trends and, if so, how could we explain them? This panel focuses on talent migration during the crisis and seeks papers with a comparative approach – be it at the national, European or regional level. It encourages papers analysing policies from countries of destination and countries of origin, and those dealing with immigration policy outputs or outcomes. The papers should include a strong theoretical emphasis, drawing on the literature from migration/education studies and the wider political science discipline. Papers with quantitative and qualitative approaches are welcome, and so are contributions from immigration scholars and policy-makers.
—-
3. State-University Relationships at Times of Crisis
Panel Chair: Tatiana Fumasoli Universitetet I Oslo
Panel Discussant: Åse Gornitzka Universitetet I Oslo
Abstract: The relations between state and university can be analyzed according to autonomy and control, as well as according to system integration. Such arrangements vary with political, societal and economic conditions. At times of crisis, the regimes underpinning the functioning of the state, of higher education (HE) as well as of other policy sectors may be challenged and reformed. Since the 80s HE systems have undergone reforms aimed at ‘modernizing’ the relationship between higher education institutions (HEIs), the state and society. These are intended, among others, to grant more autonomy to HEIs, with the assumption that, by being free to act strategically, universities can achieve greater efficiency, effectiveness, responsiveness, and European/global competitiveness. However, more recently, governments have adapted these reform foci by seeking to (re-)establish control and coordination and to enhance system integration. Some of these changes are carried out within general public sector reforms addressing public sector fragmentation and loss of political control. This panel seeks to investigate how different waves of reforms occur and impact HE systems and universities by examining the factors and conditions facilitating and/or hindering institutional change. In particular it intends to explore how the recent crisis – economic, financial, but also political and institutional – has influenced the organization and functioning of HE in Europe. 1) How do reforms with distinct rationales (e.g. deregulation and reregulation) intertwine and affect system complexity, integration, centralization, as well as state capacity of coordination? 2) How and in which dimensions has the relationship between university and state changed, particularly regarding institutional autonomy and control? 3) How are European level structures addressing and/or affecting system integration and loss of political control in HE systems and how are they linked to HEIs? 4) How do various types of HEIs, especially research intensive universities, react to such pressures for change?
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4. Constructing the European Research Area in Times of Crisis
Panel Chair: Diana Beech University of Cambridge
Panel Discussant: Julie Smith,University of Cambridge
Abstract: Amidst the financial crisis, the nature of the European Research Area (ERA) is seemingly changing. The advent of the Horizon 2020 framework programme (2014-2020), which encourages a market-driven approach to tackle ‘societal’ challenges, suggests a shift away from ‘pure’ knowledge generation towards the innovation of viable products with immediate commercial potential. With such an emphasis on producing marketable deliverables for profit, this panel asks whether policies emanating from the ERA are likely to strike a balance between the respective demands from the market, research communities and society. For instance, to what extent is the current projected vision of the ERA in danger of moving away from the motivations and expectations of scientists and researchers at the grassroots of the European innovation chain? Could the aims of the market be reached via such a strong push to ‘bring ideas to the market’? If so, what could be done to ensure that the ‘essence’ of science and research is not lost? What systems must be in place to safeguard and increase trust between policy-makers, scientists and citizens? Could the ERA be constructed in such a way so as to simultaneously address the needs of all stakeholders? If not, who ‘should’ be the ‘winners’ and ‘losers’? And, most importantly, who decides? This panel invites contributions from all theoretical and methodological schools addressing the above questions that would allow us to reflect on the impact that the crisis has had on the construction of the ERA. All papers should touch on whether the trend we are currently observing has been in the making since 2000 and the crisis merely expedited this process, or if the crisis is actually a critical juncture in the history of European research cooperation and governance so that the reactions we are seeing now indicate future pathways.
—-
5. Universities, International Elites and Knowledge Production: A Global History in the Making?
Panel Chair: Meng-Hsuan Chou Universitetet I Oslo
Panel Discussant: Pauline Ravinet Institute of Political Studies Lille
Abstract: Universities are central to the process of knowledge production and diffusion. Elite universities, moreover, have a crucial role in the selection, socialisation and reproduction of national and global elites. Interestingly, international relations scholars have yet to fully examine the role of the University as a powerful actor on the world stage. This panel explores this theme and investigates how universities and academic professionals who work in these institutions serve as agents of diffusion (across borders, across sectors) and respond to internal and external pressures to transmit knowledge and ‘bring ideas to the market’. This perspective is especially interesting in light of the current economic climate and is essential to making sense of the complex processes underpinning the consolidation of the Europe of Knowledge (i.e. these processes do not occur in isolation but in parallel with other regional developments). Academia has long served as the global bridge between diverse societies and cultures. Indeed, universities are enmeshed in what de Sola Pool refers to as the invisible college – a global intellectual network in which elite institutions serve as nodes. Given the ‘crisis’ context (past and present), to what extent has the international systems of higher education changed with respect to existing dominant patterns of diffusion of ideas and knowledge? Are the elite global universities today equally as, or even more, influential than in the past? Or have the budget cuts prevalent in the last few years at these institutions paved the way for newer and richer institutions to set the global agendas and influence prevailing political and social discourses? And how does variation in the safeguards associated with academic freedom such as tenure affect the ability of universities to serve as global agents of diffusion? To address these questions, this panel invites papers with strong theoretical perspective and rigorous empirical analysis.
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6. The Euro Crisis and the Situation of Human Resources in the Europe of Knowledge
Panel Chair: Jos Real-Dato Universidad de Granada
Abstract: During the first decade of the 21st century, the European Union has substantially increased the efforts to promote mobility (both inter-territorial and inter-sector), as well as to create an adequate environment for the human resources involved in academic, research, and innovation activities. In the line of the section, this panel is oriented to explore the consequences of the financial crisis the European Union and, particularly, some countries in the Euro zone are experiencing since 2009 in the situation of university and research human resources and the related policies. We welcome papers examining any of the different facets of this situation – from studies analyzing the consequences of the crisis in the governance, design, or implementation of the different strategies (EHEA process, ERA process) and policies at the EU or member State level directed to promote the above mentioned goals in the construction of a ‘Europe of Knowledge’ in the human resources, to those focused on the particular manifestations of financial strains on the particular conditions of researchers or academic personnel (organizational recruitment, career management, brain drain, changes in labour conditions, etc).
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7. Boundaries of the Europe of Knowledge
Panel Chair: Pauline Ravinet Institute of Political Studies Lille
Panel Discussant: Rasmus Bertelsen Aalborg Universitet
Abstract:  This panel aims at contributing to the analysis of how Europe of knowledge is redefined and transformed at times of crises (i.e. the meaning of the Europe of knowledge project, its relative position to other European policies, the alteration of governance mechanisms etc.).
In this panel, we choose to investigate these potential redefinition and transformation through the question of the boundaries of the Europe of knowledge. Different types of boundaries will be considered. Some contributions of the panel will study geographical boundaries: Is there a renewed importance to national boundaries and competences or on the contrary a mechanism of more delegation to the European level (searching for more funding)? What about the Europe of knowledge in relations to other regions in the world? What initiatives are in place beyond the European Union and how do they impact developments in Europe (e.g. how have they evolved with the crisis)? Secondly, this panel aims to explore what is at play at sectoral boundaries. As a segment of European policy space, Europe of knowledge incorporates different policy sectors connected to the production, transmission and diffusion of knowledge. The boundaries between these sectors (for instance, higher education and research, education and lifelong learning, research and innovation) might be reinterpreted with the actual economic and political crisis, they might as well be a place of friction and reallocation of power. Finally, this panel would also consider to what extent the crisis is affecting the public / private boundaries in the Europe of knowledge. Can we observe that knowledge policies are understood as problem solvers to restore employment and competitiveness and therefore remain a priority for public intervention, or can we rather observe strategies to foster the mobilization of the private sector in times of cut of public spending? Or both combined?